Courses

Credits
Ancient Greek Beginner I

Ancient Greek is one of the most important source languages of Late Antique & Medieval Studies, Ancient Philosophy and Religious Studies. Whether your interest is in reading classical Greek texts in their own right, in studying their reception in the Middle Ages or, ultimately, in moving from classical texts towards Late Antique and Byzantine literature, a thorough training in Ancient Greek will be the conditio sine qua non to pursue any of these goals.

Sámuel Gábor 3
Ancient Greek Intermediate I

Ancient Greek is one of the most important source languages of Late Antique & Medieval Studies, Ancient Philosophy and Religious Studies. Whether your interest is in reading classical Greek texts in their own right, in studying their reception in the Middle Ages or, ultimately, in moving from classical texts towards Late Antique and Byzantine literature, a thorough training in ancient Greek will be the conditio sine qua non to pursue any of these goals.
Goals and learning outcomes. Participants of the course will gain a sound knowledge of the Ancient Greek language (Attic dialect), i.e. an ability to read, analyse and interpret primary source material written in Greek. After four terms (two years) of study – i.e., in time for PhD studies in most cases –, participants should be able to attend Greek Text Seminars or advanced classes in Classical and Byzantine Greek offered at CEU or in higher education institutions other than CEU.

Sámuel Gábor 3
Arabic Beginner I

Arabic (classical – pre 20th century - and modern) is one of the most important languages required to understand Middle East culture and Medieval history. Learning Arabic is essential to all those who have interest in getting an overall vision of Islamic history and understand the thorough link between Islamic and Christian cultures, political and economical developments, as well as linguistic features throughout middle ages up till recent days. Achieving the ability to read, and later to analyze historical Arabic texts provides the student not only a unique capability of understanding most of the intercultural and political events between Medieval Europe and Middle East, but also to have the chance of creating his own standpoint concerning those events. Briefly, reading Arabic texts in source language opens a wide and new horizon for the student in learning Medieval history and following the development of Arabic language throughout 15 centuries of continuous usage.

Rashed Daher 3
Arabic Intermediate I

Arabic (classical – pre 20th century - and modern) is one of the most important languages required to understand Middle East culture and Medieval history. Learning Arabic is essential to all those who have interest in getting an overall vision of Islamic history and understand the thorough link between Islamic and Christian cultures, political and economical developments, as well as linguistic features throughout middle ages up till recent days. Achieving the ability to read, and later to analyze historical Arabic texts provides the student not only a unique capability of understanding most of the intercultural and political events between Medieval Europe and Middle East, but also to have the chance of creating his own standpoint concerning those events. Briefly, reading Arabic texts in source language opens a wide and new horizon for the student in learning Medieval history and following the development of Arabic language throughout 15 centuries of continuous usage.

Rashed Daher 3
Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian Beginner I

Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian are three standard languages spoken by the majority of population of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, and Montenegro. They are mutually intelligible languages belonging to the South
Slavic branch of languages. Partly for that reason and partly because of their shared historical development, they are often considered to be the three standard versions of one Serbo-Croatian, or Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian language.
Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian languages share a common core, which enables all their speakers to communicate freely with one another. Students might choose to concentrate on Bosnian, Croatian or Serbian, but focusing on any of these languages will allow them to comprehend and to communicate throughout the region where these languages are spoken.

Nirvana Silnovic 2
Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian Intermediate I

Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian are three standard languages spoken by the majority of population of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, and Montenegro. They are mutually intelligible languages belonging to the South Slavic branch of languages. Partly for that reason and partly because of their shared historical development, they are often considered to be the three standard versions of one Serbo-Croatian, or Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian language. Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian languages share a common core, which enables all their speakers to communicate freely with one another. Students might choose to concentrate on Bosnian, Croatian or Serbian, but focusing on any of these languages will allow them to comprehend and to communicate throughout the region where these languages are spoken.

Nirvana Silnovic 2
Classical Syriac I

Classical Syriac (Ktobonoyo: “the Bookish Language”) is an Aramaic dialect that served as the literary language of the Aramaic-speaking Christian communities. The golden age of Syriac literature extended from the third to the seventh century AD and has produced a great amount of important literature, partly as original works and partly as translations from the Greek. After the Arab conquest of the Middle East, besides producing original works, Syriac served as a bridge language and culture between Greek and Arabic; its influence extended as far as India and China, while the Syriac alphabet constituted the basis for the Sogdian and Uygur scripts, thus indirectly influencing Tibetan and Mongolian, too. Diverse Asian Christian communities have used Classical Syriac as a liturgical and literary language up to the present day. The present course is offered to those just beginning their Syriac studies and intermediate students. For the beginners the course, as the first part of a two-

István Perczel 2
Latin Beginner I

This seminar provides an introduction to Classical (and Postclassical) Latin as a source language by means of a detailed overview of the grammatical structure of Latin (morphology and elements of syntax) and practical translation exercises of short texts illustrating various registers of the language.

Cristian-Nicolae Gaşpar 3
Latin Intermediate I

This seminar comes as a continuation to the “Beginner Latin I & II” courses. It completes the introduction to Classical (and Postclassical) Latin as a source language by means of a detailed overview of the grammatical structure of Latin (morphology and elements of syntax) and practical translation exercises of short texts illustrating various registers of the language.

Cristian-Nicolae Gaşpar 3
Modern Hebrew Beginner I

Modern (or Israeli) Hebrew is the standard form of Hebrew spoken today, mainly in Israel. Its roots are in Biblical Hebrew, which died out as a vernacular by the 3rd century BCE, but was used continuously as a liturgical and literary language, and came to be revived as a spoken language in the 19th and 20th centuries – using Biblical Hebrew morphemes, Rabbinic spelling, Sephardi pronunciation, and idioms and calques from Yiddish. In its modern form, it has been highly influenced by Yiddish, Russian, English and Arabic as well.

Szonja Komoroczy 3
Ottoman Turkish Beginner I

This course aims to provide students who are familiar with Arabic script with basic knowledge of Turkish-Arabic-Persian grammar. It offers a combination of reading exercises and reflection on textual patterns. Examples of texts from a variety of genres will be treated in order to develop participants’ reading skills with knowledge of specific vocabulary and means of expression used in them, and to give students an idea of what kind of sources are available to an historian.

Eda Guclu 3
Persian Beginner I

The aim of the two-term course is to introduce students -working on the Islamic world- to the basic grammar and language of Modern and Classical Persian. (CEFR levels A1-A2)

Ágnes Németh Kalotáné 3
Russian Beginner I

The course offers a great opportunity to everyone who wants to learn Russian. While it is originally aimed at teaching Russian as a source language to CEU students who need it for their research, the course fits well everyone who simply wishes to learn that language.

Irina Toth 2
Russian Intermediate I

The Russian Intermediate I course is designed for those students who are already familiar with basics of Russian language and need to deepen their knowledge. It is expected that mainly the History department students will participate in these classes and whose primary goal is an ability to read historical sources in Russian language. That is why the focus of the course is on improving the reading, writing and listening skills rather than speaking.

Irina Toth 2
Turkish Beginner I

This course is offered to students who do not have any knowledge of Turkish language. The aim is to make participants familiar with the basic structure of Turkish through the examination of grammatical organization, sentence patterns, and vocabulary. The development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills will be equally considered. By the end of the term, students are expected to communicate the language at a practical and daily level.

Eda Guclu 3
Yiddish Beginner I

Yiddish is 1000 years old, with a very rich linguistic, cultural, literary heritage, its first written literary source dating from 1272. Yiddish was the language spoken by most Ashkenazi Jews until the Holocaust, and it has over half a million speakers today. Yiddish can be important in the fields of history, anthropology, sociology, cultural heritage studies, women’s studies, and many more fields.

As Jewish languages in general, Yiddish is written with the Hebrew alphabet. But having developed in the homeland of Ashkenazi Jews, from a dialect of Middle High German, it contains approximately 70% Germanic elements in vocabulary and grammar – and it is therefore fairly easy to learn for speakers of other Germanic languages. The two-term course is designed to introduce students with no, or very little previous knowledge to Yiddish language and written heritage.

Szonja Ráhel Komoróczy 3